Danellie’s research interests cross a broad range of topics from human factors and ergonomics, to developing and implementing “in country” health and safety training programs for the small scale and artisanal mining sector in developing countries.

Recent research projects include using technology to measure continuous exposures to whole-body vibration at surface and underground Australian coal mines, and data collection to evaluate proximity advisory interfaces to assist haul-truck drivers avoid light vehicle collisions. 

Danellie has worked across a number of key projects including the CSIRO Minerals Down Under Flagship project investigating automation technologies employed in the mining sector; and industry funded projects related to semi-automated equipment integration, control room design and ergonomic issues encountered by haul-truck operators. She has also managed several International Mining for Developing Countries (IM4DC) projects focussed on “in-country “ health and safety training programs for the artisanal and small scale mining sector, with a particular focus on sub sahara Ghana; and has advised on training programs for the small scale mining sector in Papua and New Guinea. Danellie has also been involved in teaching post-graduate subjects related to human factors in the mining industry.

Danellie holds a Bachelor of Physiotherapy and Masters of Ergonomics (both from the University of Queensland). Danellie is a Certified Professional member of the Ergonomics Society of Australia Inc. 

She is currently a PhD candidate at MISHC where she is using the innovative whole-body vibration (WBV) iOS application to measure whole-body vibration exposure levels at surface and underground mines and investigating methods to reduce heavy equipment operator exposures. Danellie has presented the WBV application concept at international conferences in the USA and Sweden where it has generated strong interest and potential collaborative projects. 

Industry

Danellie regularly engages with people from the mining industry, including mining companies, regulatory agencies, and peak mining and non-mining bodies.

Collaborations

Danellie's has collaborated with various Australian industry partners on ACARP and Coal Services Health and Safety Trust funded projects. She has also collaborated with the Minerals Commission of Ghana, the Minerals Resources Authority of Papua and New Guinea, the University of Mines and Technology (Tarkwa Ghana), and the University of Gothenburg Unit for Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Key Publications

Horberry, T. & Lynas, D. (2012). Human interaction with automated mining equipment: the development of an emerging technologies database. Ergonomics Australia, 81 : 1-6

Burgess-Limerick, R. & Lynas, D. (2015). An iOS application for evaluating whole-body vibration within a workplace risk management process. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 12, D137-D142.

Burgess-Limerick, R. & Lynas, D. (2016). Long duration measurements of whole-body vibration exposures associated with surface coal mining equipment compared to previous short-duration measurements. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 13, 339-345.

Lynas, D., Logrosa, G., & Fawcett, B. (2016). ASM community health, safety and sanitation: A water focus. Book chapter in Africa’s Mineral Fortune: The Science and Politics of Sustainability in the Extractives Industries (in press) University of Chicago Press. N. Collins, S.H. Ali & K. Sturman (Eds).

Cliff, D, Harris, J, Bofinger C and Lynas, D (2017). The application of risk management methods to the control of respire dust in underground mines. In: AusIMM MInesafe International Conference. Minesafe International Conference, Perth, WA, Australia, (10-19) 1-2 May 2017.

Funding

The majority of Danellie’s funding has come from ACARP and Coal Services projects. She has also undertaken a number of industry funded projects.