Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre

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Postgraduate students have the privilege of working with internationally respected researchers and leading industry partners in the fields of mining and mineral processing, and have access to state of the art pilot plant and laboratory facilities at SMI’s Indooroopilly mine site.  A strong industry focus and applied research projects provide candidates with both academic challenges and opportunities to engage with minerals industry professionals.

PhD Projects

  1. Development of an empirical relationship to model turbulance in a full scale flotation machine (Germán Figueroa)
  2. Develop a High Voltage Pulse Testing Facility for Ore Pre-Concentration (Daniel Lay)
  3. Linking ore characteristics and comminution behaviour  (Pia Lois Morales)
  4. Modelling the impact of ore (feed) characteristics on mill performance (Constanza Paredes Bujes)
  5. Development of an Empirical Model of the Hydrofloat Cell (Konuray Demir)
  6. Dynamic simulation of materials handling and storage in dry comminution circuits (Ziming Ye)
  7. Differential separation of high Au and low Au pyrite species in gold ores (Ditend Tesh)
  8. Development of a model informed process control system for coal (Joyce Siong)
  9. Development of a financial modelling for multi component mineral process simulators (Jeremy Hanhiniemi)
  10. Predicting physical breakage properties of ore from microstructure and texture for use in Geometallurgical modelling (Shujaat Ali)
  11. Hydrocyclone optimisation (Mussa Lisso)
  12. Circuit options to Integrate High Voltage Pulse technology into mining. The Liberation Effect
    of HVP on Downstream Processing Efficacy (Flavio Andre)
  13. Investigating best comminution and classification circuit design for coarse particle
    flotation (Hayla Miceli)
  14. Application of Machine Learning to identify Process operating regime for real time models calibration (Niranjan Adhikari)

Masters/Honours Projects

  1. Rheological properties of Lihir ore (Peter William Legge)
  2. Enchancing Grade Engineering through multiple and high-speed collisions (Raoni Antunes Ferreira Lage)
  3. The Investigation into Multi-Stage Impact Breakage (Bernard Selasie Agbenuvor)
  4. Promoting selective breakage using various forms of abrasion (Alfred Septian)
  5. Integrating flotation with comminution (Pascal Chamboko)
  6. Application of blast fragmentation and movement models to predict and optimise the downstream crushing, grinding and flotation performance (Raphael Costa Picorelli)

Topics for future students

Potential topics currently available for postgraduate research projects in the area of Digital Mining are listed below:

For further information, please contact Associate Professor Mohsen Yahyaei

  1. Digital Mining
  2. Process prediction and control
  3. Dynamic modelling
  4. Surface breakage and liner wear

Potential topics currently available for postgraduate research projects in the area of Mineral liberation modelling and comminution are listed below:

For further information, please contact Dr Marko Hilden

  1. Mineral texture and liberation
  2. Unit models AG/SAG mills, HPGR, Vibrating screens
  3. Multicomponent and dynamic circuit simulation

Potential topics currently available for postgraduate research projects in the area of breakage characterisation are listed below:

For further information, please contact Associate Professor Mohsen Yahyaei

  1. Ore characterisation: mechanical properties of rock particles, influence of texture on mechanical properties
  2. Mechanistic comminution models
  3. Dynamic mill modelling
  4. Circuit simulation: JKMdk, model development

Potential topics currently available for postgraduate research projects in the area of process improvement technologies are listed below:

For further information, please contact Associate Professor Mohsen Yahyaei

  1. Process Improvement Tools
  2. Fundamental understanding of novel comminution devices

Potential topics currently available for postgraduate research projects in the area of computational modelling are listed below:

For further information, please contact Dr Angus Morrison

  1. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling
  2. Granular and multiphase flow modelling
  3. Experimental validation of computational models
  4. Computer-aided engineering for equipment design and optimisation

    JKMRC Summer/Winter Research Programs

    JKMRC have a number of projects available for the UQ Summer & Winter Research programs. 
     
    For further information please contact Associate Professor Mohsen Yahyaei
     
    For details on how to apply, please visit the UQ Summer & Winter Research Programs website
     

    WINTER 2020 Research Programs:

     

    Project title: 

     

    Pilot Plant Digitisation – Data analysis and visualisation

    Project duration:

    5 (five) weeks, flexible.

    Description:

    Newly installed power sensors in the pilot plant allows for energy consumption to be recorded and wirelessly accessed. Next step is to work in logging, analysing and visualising the data.

    The student will work in developing a desktop application that will remotely connect to the sensors and download the newest values. These values will be logged locally in a server so they can be processed and analysed. The developed application must also allow for the data to be visualised in an user-friendly manner.

    Expected outcomes and deliverables:

    The scholar will gain skills in basic data processing and visualisation as well as developing applications. Students will also have a chance to practise their communicational skills by giving an oral presentation at the end of their project.

    Suitable for:

    This project is open to applicants with backgrounds in engineering, computer science or with knowledge in IT.

    Primary Supervisor:

    Dr Francisco Reyes-Leiva

    Further info:

    If applicants have any question please contact Dr Francisco Reyes prior to submission of their application.

     

    Project title: 

     

    Novel flotation reagents for sulphide mineral flotation

    Project duration:

    4 weeks; 2 students

    Description:

    In mineral processing, the available ores are becoming more complex and decreasing in grade. Operating mines need to be able to process ores with lower grades; therefore, an improvement in the efficiency of mineral separation processes is vital. Flotation is an important operation in mineral processing, as it is where the valuable minerals are separated and recovered from the waste material. This project forms part of a larger project to develop novel, selective reagents for flotation of sulphide minerals and seeks to test the efficiency of new flotation reagents under different reagent dosages and pulp chemistry conditions. The work involves laboratory work (flotation tests), data collection and analysis. The data collected will enable identification of the optimal operating conditions for the flotation of selective sulphide minerals.

    Expected outcomes and deliverables:

    The student will gain skills in performing experimental work, data collection and analysis in the mineral processing context and may have an opportunity to generate publications from their research. Students may also be asked to present their work and write a report at the end of the project.

    Suitable for:

    This project is open to applications from students with a background in chemistry, chemical engineering and/or metallurgical engineering students who are enrolled at UQ. Two students will be selected and will work closely on this project.

    Primary Supervisor:

    Dr Susana Brito e Abreu

    Further info:

    For enquiries about the project please contact Dr Susana Brito e Abreu prior to submission of their application.

     

    Project title: 

     

    Geometallurgy: Bond Ball Mill Work Index (BBMWI) mixtures modelling

    Project duration:

    5 weeks; 2-4 students

    Description:

    The Bond Ball Mill Work Index (BBMWI) has been used to estimate the specific energy of ball mills since the last century. Besides the errors that this methodology presents, it is being used for most of the mining companies as an ore hardness index to estimate specific energy for ball mills. The more recent approach to estimate comminution specific energy, SAG MILL COMMINUTION (SMC), also considers BBMMI as an input parameter.

    This study intends to model the BBMWI of the mixture of different lithologies to estimate more precisely this important variable for the process.

    Objective – To develop a mathematical model able to deal with non-additive variables like BMWI for mixtures of different lithologies in a mine.

    Methodology – Carry out five (5) BBMWI tests using two (2) different lithologies from a mine in different volume proportions. Power measurements and true density of solids for each test would computer-based determined.

    Expected outcomes and deliverables:

    Scholars will gain skills in data collection, experimental design and understanding of lithology of rock units. Upon completion, the applicant will provide a written report on the experiments and results, as well as deliver an oral presentation to the cognate faculty of the Sustainable Minerals Institute’s Production Centres.

    Suitable for:

    The project is suitable for undergraduate mining, minerals processing engineering, or chemical engineering students. It is open to 2-4 year students.

    Primary Supervisor:

     

    Assoc Prof Mohsen Yahyaei

    Prof Douglas Mazzinghy

    Further info:

    Potential applicants wishing to discuss this project in more detail may contact Assoc Prof Mohsen Yahyaei  prior to submission of their application.

     

    Project title: 

     

    Mining Tailings Database

    Project duration:

    5 weeks

    Description:

    Recently huge tailings dams collapsed in Brazil bringing tremendous environmental issues and lives lost. The mining sector needs to find different ways to stock tailings safely and avoid disposing of these wastes in dams. To propose solutions for these materials it is necessary to understand the volumes already stocked and the current tailings producing. Each mine has a different capacity and process, consequently, different tailings production and specifications.

    Objective:

    Collecting correct numbers about mining tailings to verify the possible uses of these materials as a coproduct in other industries and to study other possible ways to stock these materials safely.

    Methodology:

    Collect data from websites, government, papers, thesis, dissertations, etc.

    Expected outcomes and deliverables:

    Scholars will gain a broad knowledge of the global mining industry, its practices, and tailing capacities. Data collection is mainly computer-based and should include tailing production, commodity, country, tailings stocked and tailing chemical and physical information. Upon completion, the applicant will provide a written report on the survey, as well as deliver an oral presentation to the cognate faculty of the Sustainable Minerals Institute’s Production Centres.

    Suitable for:

    The project is suitable for undergraduate students in 2-3 year who is interested in minerals processing, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development. Knowledge of statistics and data analysis is essential. Prior knowledge of mining is a plus.

    Primary Supervisor:

     

    Prof Mohsen Yahyaei

    Prof Douglas Mazzinghy

    Further info:

    Potential applicants wishing to discuss this project in more detail may contact Assoc Prof Mohsen Yahyaei prior to submission of their application.

     

    Project title: 

     

    General SAG Mills Model for Dynamic Simulations

    Project duration:

    5 weeks; 2-4 students

    Description:

    The objective of this project is to develop a mathematical model able to predict, with good confidence, the product size distribution of a SAG (Semi-Autogenous mill) for dynamic simulations using just specific energy and feed and product size distributions. The assumption of this study is that all variables of the mill have a connection with the specific energy and this latter variable will determine the product size distribution.

    Methodology:

    Collect SAG data from master dissertations and PhD thesis at the JKMRC

    The database should include:

    •            Feed particle size distribution

    •            Product particle size distribution

    •            Specific Energy (kWh/t)

    Expected outcomes and deliverables:

    Scholars will gain skills in mathematical model development, data collection and analysis. Upon completion, the applicant will provide a written report on the results, as well as deliver an oral presentation to the cognate faculty of the Sustainable Minerals Institute’s Production Centres.

    Suitable for:

    The project is open to 2-4 year engineering students, particularly mining, minerals processing or chemical engineering students.

    Primary Supervisor:

     

    Assoc Prof Mohsen Yahyaei

    Prof Douglas Mazzinghy

    Further info:

    Potential applicants wishing to discuss this project in more detail may contact Assoc Prof Mohsen Yahyaei prior to submission of their application.

    JKMRC has developed many industry focussed training programs in specialised areas such as comminution, flotation, process mineralogy and statistics which are offered through SMI Education or our partner JKTech (Pty) Limited:

    1. Comparative Statistics and Experimental Design
    2. Conducting and Analysing Plant Trials
    3. JKSimFloat training
    4. JKSimMet training
    5. JK Value Chain Optimisation
    6. JK Webinars
    7. MetSkill